What I Read This Week (Dec. 1 – 7)

I Joined a Stationary Biker Gang – The Peloton phenomenon is baffling to me, so this insight was fascinating. Really appreciated the discussion of Peloton’s accessibility to people who might not otherwise exercise, despite how inaccessible their advertising makes it look.

Five Questions to Ask Instead of “Is This Really Body Positive?”

Jack Beloved – The prologue is so compelling! Really looking forward to seeing where it goes.

Real Estate Thought It Was Invincible in New York. It Wasn’t. – I wish this piece had taken more time to focus on what tenants’ rights groups’ aims are now that they are finally beginning to beat back big developers, but it’s pretty astounding just reading how much things have changed in such a short amount of time.

Presidio at 25: Back to nature

My book Tell It to the Bees was made into a film – but they changed the ending for a straight audience – “This bittersweetness is a straight person’s finale. I wanted my couple to have their cake and eat it together, for once: a fully romantic, fully happy, and therefore – in the context of lesbian fiction – a more radical ending.”

Millennials weren’t the only ones gutted by the recession. Gen X has never recovered.

Bisexuality and Me: One Trans Experience – This is so well-written, and makes it a little clearer to me why I sometimes feel more comfortable using “queer” rather than “bisexual.” Queer feels like it encompasses so many more things about me, from aspects of my sexuality to my way of viewing the world.

Why Racists (and Liberals!) Keep Writing for Quillette

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What I Read This Week (Nov 17 – Nov 23)

The End of Babies – The first time I’ve read a piece that so deeply and incisively describes my anxieties when I consider becoming a parent. (And that’s coming from someone who once dreamt of having a big family for years.)

Julián Castro: If Democrats Don’t Elevate Voters of Color, ‘Why The Hell Are We Democrats in the First Place?’

All Summer in a Day – A classic Ray Bradbury short story I’d managed to never read until this week.

‘I don’t know about normal love’: A church leader’s abuse and a woman’s years-long struggle – Content earnings for rape, sexual assault, grooming, and religious abuse.

The Magic Kingdom – “Capitalism, like all abusive relationships, creates a sense of learned helplessness in its victims. We are complicit in what it makes of us: we want so badly for what it tells us to be true.

The Middle of Everywhere – A writeup on the importance and beauty of vanishing tallgrass prairie,

The Quiet Rooms – What happens when children as young as 5 are put in “isolation rooms” for misbehaving at school? If I hadn’t already been a prison abolitionist, this piece would’ve done it.

Asians in California don’t believe hard work and determination alone equal success

Will There Ever Be a Me Too-Styled Movement for Bad Bosses? We are taught to take socially imposed power structures as a piece of nature, to believe our place within these systems as symptomatic of our strengths and shortcomings, to understand any drive to succeed and in so doing, get more power than other people, as the ultimate goal (and reward) of working life.” I liked this piece, but also feel it ignores the labor movement and others who have been pushing back against “bad bosses” and bosses in general for a very, very long time.